Lynn D'Avolio
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 11/21/2017

As a home seller, you recognize that your house is one of many that is available to prospective homebuyers. However, unlike most home sellers, you're willing to go the extra mile to ensure that your residence represents an attractive choice to homebuyers. Although you may commit significant time and resources to get your house ready for a home showing, there are several factors to consider as you prep your residence. Some of the most common factors to consider include: 1. Appearance Of course, your home's interior and exterior should look pristine so they can help your home make a great first impression on homebuyers. Furthermore, you should clean and declutter your house as much as possible before a home showing. This will allow you to highlight how your house represents a spacious, immaculate oasis that a homeowner can enjoy for years to come. Don't forget to hide personal items like photographs before you show your home, too. Ideally, you'll want homebuyers to envision what it's like to live in your house as they walk through it. And by removing personal items, you'll make it easier for homebuyers to imagine a wonderful future in which they buy your home. 2. Smells Strong smells may linger, and ultimately, impact a homebuyer's impression of your residence. Thus, you'll want to pay close attention to any smells that may turn homebuyers off. Focus on using air fresheners and candles that deliver warm, inviting aromas throughout your house. Whether it's lighting a candle that fills your home with a rich natural scent or spraying an air freshener that brings an unparalleled citrus aroma to your residence, you can use odor eliminators to disguise unpleasant smells quickly and effortlessly. You also should consider smells that may develop on the day of a home showing. For instance, cooking bacon on your kitchen stove may be part of your morning routine but can leave a lingering smell. Conversely, home sellers who try to maintain pleasant aromas throughout their houses day after day should be able to minimize repugnant smells immediately. 3. Lighting Illuminate your residence's interior and exterior as best you can, and you'll likely find that homebuyers may be more attracted to your house over others that are available. From dazzling pendant lights in the kitchen to recessed lighting in the hallways, you can make a bold statement with the right types of lighting throughout your home. Also, you should open the windows prior to a home showing to let sunlight fill your residence. By doing so, you can use natural light to illuminate your house and allow fresh air to filter through your home simultaneously. For home sellers, it is essential to devote time and resources to prep your house for an upcoming showing. And if you need extra support along the way, working with an experienced real estate agent ensures that you can receive expert assistance as you add your home to the real estate market. Consider the aforementioned factors as you get your house ready for a home showing, and you should have no trouble generating interest in your house.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 11/14/2017

This Single-Family in Saugus, MA recently sold for $314,000. This Cape style home was sold by Lynn D'Avolio - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.


100 Essex St, Saugus, MA 01906

Cliftondale

Single-Family

$314,000
Price
$314,000
Sale Price

5
Rooms
3
Beds
1/1
Full/Half Baths
The perfect starter home for is ready for new owners. Come see this open and bright 3 bedroom, 1.5 half bath New England cape with an over sized back yard. All the important updates have been done over the past 16 years by the current owners. Located minutes from route one, steps from Cliftondale Square, and next to a park and jogging/biking trail, access to much of what Saugus has to offer is not a concern.

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Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 11/14/2017

Many of us will move home several times throughout our lives. Whether itís relocating for work, needing a bigger house for children, or a quiet place to retire to, itís likely that the home you live in now wonít be yours forever.

 As a result, many homeowners wonder what they can do to ensure their home will have a high resale value when the time comes to move on.

 The good news is that there are a lot of things you can do now that will give you a good return on investment when it comes to selling your home later. However, there are a few factors that affect a homeís valuation that are out of your control. Weíll talk about all of those factors below. So, read on for a list of the factors that affect your homeís resale value.

 The age of your home

Your house may not complain about it, but it isnít getting any younger. Homes tend to slowly decrease in value over time. A home built in the late 1970s, even if itís well taken care of, most likely wonít sell for the same price as a 15-year-old home.

There is one exception to the rule, however, and that is historical houses. Homes that are a century old can sell for top dollar because of the craftsmanship and history that the house contains.

Admittedly, this is a niche market, as many people just want a safe and efficient home to live in. However, there are some homebuyers who will put in a bit of extra work around the house for the chance to live inside of a piece of history.

Smart renovations

When youíre upgrading your house itís important to remember how that upgrade will pay off years down the road. Some renovations will almost always give a good return on investment such as a finished basement or attic and improving efficiency via added insulation or replacing windows.

Renovations that match a very specific decorative taste or style could come back to haunt you. This includes bathroom sinks, kitchen cabinets, countertops, and other expensive projects that are subject to the next ownerís taste. While these upgrades can give a good return on your investment, theyíre more likely to be successful if they fit the current trends of style and craftsmanship.

Neighborhood and town

One of the factors of home valuation that you have little control over is the town and neighborhood the house is located in. If there are closed down businesses, foreclosed and deteriorating homes then potential buyers might be turned off to the neighborhood.

Similarly, the town you live in has a lot to do with how much people are willing to spend. If you have easy access to interstate highways and large cities, highly rated schools, and good local infrastructure, then buyers are likely to take these into consideration when making an offer, as the average cost of a home in your town is likely higher than some surrounding towns.




Tags: home   resale value   valuation  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 11/7/2017

Puppies can be a great addition to any household. They're cute, cuddly, loyal, and can grow to be a loving family member. However, when they are still small and untrained, puppies can wreak havoc on your home. There are also items that you should be aware of that could affect your puppy's health In order to protect your house, and dog, from any permanent puppy damage, follow these tips.

  • A new puppy will be curious, so make sure to remove most items that are within reach, and not nailed down, to prevent them from becoming too destructive, or making themselves sick.
  • Believe it or not, some common, household plants can prove very toxic for dogs. To protect their fragile stomachs, familiarize yourself with these plants (see this article from Pet Education). Remove these plants from your home, or put them in a place where they cannot be reached.
  • Puppies will eat pretty much anything, so you will need to keep them from getting into your food, garbage, and cleaning supplies. Keep cleaning supplies in high cupboards, or use child locks on your lower cabinets, to prevent a nosy canine from getting in and using your bleach bottle as a chew toy. This same tip can go for food. Particular foods that can harm your dog include grapes, raisins, chocolate and coffee. For your garbage, try finding a locking garbage can, that way even if it gets tipped over, he cannot get into the bag and eat things that he shouldn't. For smaller, bathroom trashcans, try to keep them up high and out of reach.
  • Close off stairways with a baby gate, until they have fully mastered going up and down the stairs safely.
  • To prevent the puppy from chewing on wooden legs of furniture, spray them with a disinfectant with a particular scent or smell that may deter them away from this object. Just make sure it is non-toxic! Vinegar may work just as well.
  • Keep cords and wires well out of reach. These can be a potential fire hazard, as well as could seriously injure the pup. You could bundle them together with clips, or get cord protectors. Also, anything on the floor level that is plugged into an electrical socket (i.e. phone charger, air-fresheners, etc), make sure to unplug those, as they could electrocute the puppy if they attempt to chew on it.
  • Make other spaces in and around your home puppy safe, as well. Your garage has many dangerous chemicals and objects that a puppy could easily get into if they start roaming around. Make sure everything is up high, or locked up tight.
  • For your yard, make sure you get rid of any plants that could be poisonous to dogs, as well as any yard decorations that are eye level to them and could get chewed up. Make sure your garden chemicals are not hazardous to animals. If they start chewing the grass or plants, they could become ill. To protect your wicker lawn furniture, try typing cloths around the legs to prevent your dog from chewing them.
As much as your home and the quality of your material possessions are important, your dog's life is of much greater importance. Make sure to keep them safe, and your home less chewed up, by taking precautions before you bring Fido home!




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 10/31/2017

There's a cheap office supply product available almost anywhere that can improve your home organization, save you money, and help prevent food-borne illnesses: ordinary stickers.

By stocking up on a variety of blank stickers, you can boost your efficiency around the house, save time, and reduce confusion.

Here are a few examples of how this basic strategy can prevent problems and simplify your life:

  • Leftover food: How many times have you looked at a container or package of leftover food in the refrigerator and wondered if it's still reasonably fresh and safe to eat? If you label it with the date, you'll never have to risk getting sick from food that's been sitting around in the fridge for weeks (or longer). "When in doubt, throw it out" is a good policy for dealing with perishable food items, but you also don't want to get in the habit of throwing out perfectly good food. Everyone has slightly different standards for how long food should be kept, but when leftovers are not labeled, your only option is to guess how long it's been there -- and that method isn't too accurate! As a side note, there are several government agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture, that can advise you on recommended refrigeration storage times (and safe temperatures) for different types of food. Generally, it's three or four days, but it can be more or less, depending on how perishable it is, whether the package has been opened, and if it's cooked or raw. Frozen food has a much longer shelf life (usually one or two months in the freezer), but if you don't label it, you may have no idea what it is ("mystery meat?") or how long it's been in storage! Clearly labeling refrigerated and frozen food will give you peace of mind, help prevent you from throwing away food prematurely (saving you money), and reduce your chances of getting food-borne illnesses.
  • Old keys: Did you ever stumble upon an old key and wonder which door, suitcase, file cabinet, or car it's meant for? You can always try it out on different locks, luggage, or vehicles, but it could easily be from a previous residence, an item you no longer own, or a vehicle you traded in years ago. A much more efficient method would be to place the key in a small envelope or zip-lock bag and label it with identifying information. Labeling the tag on the keychain is another option.
  • House paint: Paint cans that have been around for years can often be difficult to identify, especially if the original product label is obscured by paint spills. By adding a descriptive label displaying the date, the room it was used on, and the color, it will be much easier to organize and find the paint you need when you want touch up your walls or baseboards.
While some members of the family may tease you for putting labels on everything, the amount of time, money, and frustration you'll be saving down the road will be well worth the inconvenience (and the ribbing)!