Lynn D'Avolio
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 9/26/2017

Have you ever visited someone's home and thought to yourself, "Their living room seems really cluttered" or "Those counter tops look like they haven't been updated since the 1960s!"

Many people quickly notice decorating flaws or home maintenance issues in other people's houses, but when it comes to their own homes -- well, that's another story!

Why is that the case? Two reasons: You're emotionally attached to your own home environment and you're also "too close to the trees to see the forest." It's hard to step back and see your home through a fresh set of eyes -- which is exactly the way prospective buyers are going to look it.

Curb appeal -- or a lack, thereof-- will be the first thing they notice, followed by positive or negative first impressions of your home's interior -- if they get that far! So if you're preparing to put your home on the market, you don't want to be like the person who tries to represent themselves in court. As Abraham Lincoln once said, they have "a fool for a client!"

Since first impressions are so vital when selling your house, it makes sense to confer with someone who really knows the ropes when it comes to home staging. Typically, that would be one of the following professionals:

  • An experienced real estate agent: Real estate agents are in the business of helping people sell their homes as quickly and profitably as possible -- it's a win/win situation. In all likelihood, they've conducted hundreds of house tours and listened to a massive amount of feedback from prospective buyers. One thing they've invariably noticed is that a lot of people react the same way to the same issues. Based on experience and a trained eye, most real estate agents can quickly spot and point out cost-effective ways to make your home more marketable and visually appealing.
  • A professional home stager: Although not all communities have access to professional home stagers, there are talented and knowledgeable experts in that field who can offer valuable advice. If you're working with an experienced real estate agent, however, it probably would not be necessary to pay extra to hire a professional staging consultant.

According to the National Association of Realtors, the median amount of money spent on staging a home is $675, so it doesn't necessarily have to be ultra-expensive. In a survey of its membership, Realtors ranked living rooms and kitchens as the most important rooms to stage. Also considered important are the master bedroom, dining room, and bathrooms.

Thirty seven percent of Realtors® representing sellers believe that buyers most often offer a 1 to 5 percent increase on the value of a staged home. A smaller percentage say the potential increase is in the neighborhood of 6% to 10%. However you look at it, you're tipping the scales in your direction when you make your home look its best prior to putting it up for sale.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 9/12/2017

As a first-time home seller, it is important to avoid shortcuts. By doing so, this home seller may be better equipped than others to reduce the risk of accepting a "lowball" offer on his or her residence.

A lowball offer is something that every home seller would like to avoid. Yet a home seller who lacks real estate knowledge and insights may struggle to identify a lowball offer, particularly if he or she is listing a residence for the first time.

Ultimately, there is no need for a first-time home seller to settle for a lowball offer. Lucky for you, we're here to teach you how to identify a lowball offer in any real estate market, at any time.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help a first-time home seller identify and address a lowball offer on his or her residence.

1. Learn About the Housing Market

The housing market often fluctuates, and a real estate sector that favors home sellers today may morph into one that favors homebuyers tomorrow. As such, a first-time home seller should allocate the necessary time and resources to monitor real estate market patterns and trends closely.

To learn about the housing market, it is essential to analyze available houses in your city or town. Furthermore, don't forget to assess available houses that are similar to your own.

Housing market data can provide pivotal insights that a home seller can use to stir up substantial interest in his or her residence. Plus, these insights can help a home seller establish a competitive price for a home, thereby reducing the risk of receiving a lowball offer on his or her house.

2. Understand Your Home's Value

For first-time home sellers who want to avoid lowball offers, a home appraisal is ideal. In fact, a home appraisal can make it simple for a first-time home seller to understand what his or her property is worth based on its current condition.

As part of a home appraisal, a property inspector will assess a house both inside and out. After the appraisal is completed, the inspector will provide a home seller with a report that outlines his or her findings. Then, a home seller can use the report findings to review a house's strengths and weaknesses and complete home improvements as needed.

A home appraisal can help a home seller uncover ways to bolster a house's interior and exterior. In addition, the appraisal can provide insights that highlight a home's true value and help a home seller minimize the risk that he or she will accept a lowball proposal.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

A first-time home seller may be uncertain about how to proceed with an offer. Fortunately, real estate agents can provide unparalleled insights into the housing market and help home sellers make informed decisions.

In most instances, a real estate agent is happy to discuss an offer with a home seller. This housing market professional can offer honest, unbiased home selling recommendations to ensure a home seller can differentiate between a lowball offer and a strong proposal as well.

Avoid the danger of accepting a lowball offer on a residence – use the aforementioned tips, and a first-time home seller will be better equipped than ever before to accept the best proposal for his or her house.




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Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 8/15/2017

When you sell your home, it may be tempting to just try and put your home on the market yourself without any assistance. By hiring a real estate agent, you’ll have a insurance policy of sorts that allows you to know that everything is taken care of throughout the process of selling. The general goal in selling a home is to sell it as fast as possible for the most amount of money that you can. A realtor should do a bit more for you than simply post the home and hope that it sells. Here’s what a great realtor who is looking to be an advocate for their sellers will do for you:


Put The Home On The Market For The Right Price


Selling a home at the right price is the single most important thing that can be done in the entire process. A good seller’s agent will pinpoint the right price for your home. If the home is priced too high, there will be no interest in the property. People will believe that the price can only come down. If the price is set too low, a bidding war can ensue, or buyers may wonder what’s wrong with the property. There’s many different formulas and methods that agents will use to price the property right. The important thing is that the agent does his research.


The Market Needs To Be Marketed


Marketing is one thing that agents should be good at. A good seller’s agent will take good photos of a property or hire a professional photographer if needed. The photos and videos that are put up online are a big part of how homes get sold. Buyers want to know the property before they even see it in person. A realtor can help make this impression visible online.


Communicate With You


An agent should keep their sellers informed about what’s going on in the sale of their home. Even if offers haven’t come in, realtors should be getting in touch with their clients regularly to update them on home showings, concerns, and open house dates. A good seller’s agent will regularly communicate with you throughout the sale of your home. At the start of the sale, you’ll know a realtor is a good fit since they’ll return your calls and e-mails promptly.


Be There For The Home Appraisal


When you’re selling your home, the appraisal can be one of the most nerve-wracking things that occurs during the entire process. Your agent should attend the appraisal to help clarify confusion and answer the appraiser’s questions. The realtor will be educated on the recent updates that have been made to the home. These are what add immense value to the home.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 5/2/2017

When prospective homebuyers see your residence, are they impressed or disappointed? A homebuyer's first impression might depend on your house's curb appeal – something that can make or break a home sale. For home sellers, ensuring your home is attractive to homebuyers is paramount. Thus, it is essential for home sellers to spend some time avoiding these common curb appeal mistakes: 1. Keeping Clutter on Your Front Lawn Lawn ornaments like a bright pink flamingo sculpture or large pinwheels may help your home's front lawn make a bold statement. At the same time, however, they can clutter up your front lawn and may be an eyesore for prospective homebuyers. When it comes to clutter, you'll want to do whatever it takes to eliminate it from your front lawn entirely. By doing so, homebuyers will be able to focus on your home's outstanding exterior and its other stunning features. Remember, your goal as a home seller is to keep your residence as neat and clean as possible and allow your home to make a positive first impression on homebuyers. And if you devote time and resources to remove clutter from your front lawn, you'll be able to showcase the size and beauty of your front lawn day after day. 2. Ignoring Peeling Paint on Your Home's Exterior Adding a fresh coat of paint to your home's exterior is never a bad idea, particularly for home sellers who notice peeling paint. Typically, you can touch up areas where peeling paint is present and eliminate such problems instantly. If your home needs an extensive paint job, you may be better off hiring a professional home painter as well. This home renovation expert will help you take the guesswork out of repainting your home's exterior and work toward transforming a drab exterior into a fabulous one. 3. Failing to Replace Outdated Light Fixtures You know the light in your driveway that constantly flickers at night? Well, now may be a great time to replace it, especially if you're a home seller who wants to boost his or her house's curb appeal. Outdated light fixtures will do more harm than good for your home's curb appeal. But if you install new light fixtures, you'll be better equipped to enhance your home's curb appeal at night. As a home seller, you'll want to ensure homebuyers can view the beauty of your residence during the day and evening. Meanwhile, installing new light fixtures enables you to brighten up your home's exterior and improve your house's chances of making a great first impression on homebuyers. Curb appeal represents an important factor for home sellers, and if you ever feel unsure about how to improve your house's curb appeal, hiring a real estate agent usually is a wonderful idea. A real estate agent possesses industry experience and know-how and can help you explore innovative ways to improve your home's curb appeal. And ultimately, this professional can empower you with the insights and resources you need to accelerate the home selling process. Enhance your residence's curb appeal, and you may be able to reap the benefits of a fast home sale.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 6/28/2016

A house needs to be sold three times when it is on the market. First it needs to be sold to other agents so they will want to show and sell the home. Second it needs to be sold to buyers and lastly to the appraiser. Even if the buyer is willing to pay a certain price for a home they usually need a mortgage. That means it is actually the bank who is buying the home. The bank wants to protect their investment so they do an appraisal. When the appraisal comes back low or as an under-appraisal deals can fall apart. If you are a seller or a buyer you need to know how to protect yourself from short appraisals? Here are some suggestions from Bankrate.com for buyers and sellers. If you're a buyer: -- Tell your lender to find an appraiser who comes from your county, or perhaps a neighboring county. -- Request that the appraiser have a residential appraiser certification and a professional designation. Examples include the Appraisal Institute's senior residential appraiser, or SRA, or member of the Appraisal Institute, or MAI, designations. -- Meet the appraiser when he or she inspects the home and share your knowledge of recent short sales and foreclosures that might skew the comps. "Many appraisers are just pulling up data out of MLS (Multiple Listing Service) or off the deed at the courthouse and not checking it out," Sellers says. "Most good appraisers will appreciate the information." And yes, you can speak with your appraiser; the prohibition only applies to your lender. If you're a seller: --·Get an appraisal before you list a home. Search for a qualified appraiser in your area on the Appraisal Institute website. -- Use the appraisal to set a realistic listing price for your home. -- Give a copy of your pre-listing appraisal to the buyer's appraiser. The more professional appraisers will understand that you're just trying to add more data and another perspective. -- Question a low appraisal. There's always a chance the appraiser or a supervisor will take into account new or overlooked information.