Lynn D'Avolio
Century 21 North East | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 7/24/2018

For home sellers, accepting a homebuyer's offer represents one of many steps you'll need to complete to finalize your home sale. In fact, accepting a homebuyer's proposal provides no guarantees, and a homebuyer likely will conduct a home inspection that may determine whether he or she moves forward with a home purchase.

Ultimately, a home inspection may make or break your home sale. But if you spend some time preparing for a home inspection, you can improve your chances of accelerating the home selling process.

Here are three tips to help home sellers get ready for a home inspection.

1. Clean Up Your Home's Interior and Exterior

A home inspector will investigate every nook and cranny of your house. As such, you'll want to ensure your residence dazzles when a home inspector visits, as any flaw could damage your chances of finalizing your home sale.

Conduct an extensive clean-up of your house's interior and exterior – you'll be happy you did. With a neat, tidy home, you'll be able to improve your chances of making a positive impression on a home inspector.

Plus, evaluating your residence before a home inspection ensures you can identify and address any minor flaws before the evaluation. That way, you'll be able to eliminate any problems and improve your chances of a fast, seamless home inspection that won't jeopardize your home sale.

2. Ensure All Areas of Your Home Are Easily Accessible

A home inspector will want to examine your hot water heater, your home's siding and more, so you'll want to make every area of your home easily accessible to a home inspector to guarantee he or she can perform the assessment properly.

Although a home inspector may uncover a variety of problems with your residence, the assessment represents a valuable learning opportunity for both you and the homebuyer. Thus, if all areas of your home are easily accessible, you may be able to make the most of this opportunity, learn about hidden problems with your residence and work to resolve these issues accordingly.

3. Consult with Your Real Estate Agent

Let's face it – a home inspection can be stressful, particularly for home sellers who want to finalize a home sale as soon as possible. Luckily, your real estate agent can help you minimize stress and ensure you know exactly what to expect before, during and after a home inspection.

Your real estate agent can answer any of your home inspection questions and ensure you are fully prepared for the assessment. In addition, your real estate agent will collaborate with you and the homebuyer. And if problems are discovered during a home inspection, your real estate agent will help you determine the best course of action.

When it comes to a home inspection, there is no need to worry. If you use the aforementioned tips to prepare for a home inspection, you'll be able to improve your chances of speeding up the home selling process.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 12/13/2016

home fireplaceOdds are if you're reading this you have at least one camera within your vicinity. Whether it's on your laptop, smartphone, or tablet cameras are built into many of our daily-use electronics. The temptation is there, for someone selling a home, to just take out their phone and snap some photos to easily upload to listings. However, there's a lot more to taking great real estate photographs that will catch the eye of potential buyers and set you apart from the competition. Follow these tips to create professional looking photographs without spending hundreds on a professional photographer.

Step 1: Do your research

Photography is an art. Even an untrained eye can tell the difference between photos taken by a professional and those taken by the layperson. But that doesn't mean you can't take photos that will stand out--with a little practice. The first step is to hit the books, or better: the internet. Find some real estate photos that look great to try and emulate. Notice the angles they're taken from and the lighting they use. You'll notice that many photos give a wide view of a room. That's because they're probably taken with a wide-angle or fixed lens. Notice the room setup as well. This will come in handy later when we talk about room staging.

a well-positioned, knowledgeable photographer with an iPhone can take a better shot than an amateur with all the equipment in the world.

Step 2: Know your equipment

Equipment for real estate photography often includes multiple cameras, lenses, lighting fixtures, a tripod, and so on. But a well-positioned, knowledgable photographer with an iPhone can take a better shot than an amateur with all the equipment in the world. In fact, much of real estate photography includes combining images to get the perfect amount of highlights and shadows in the room (this is called HDR photography). If you own an iPhone 6, you'll be happy to learn that it boasts a built-in HDR feature that takes great photos.

Step 3: Room staging matters

Have you ever moved something in a room, say a coffee table or couch, and noticed that the room looked entirely different afterward? The arrangement of objects in a room can make it look breathable and spacious or claustrophobic and stuffy. Staging a room allows you to highlight the best features of the home. If there's something you want buyers to notice first, such as a fireplace, make sure there are no objects in front of it and put it close to the center of the photo. Another important tip for staging a room: remove personal items. You don't want your photos to look like you just happened to walk through someone's home with their children's portraits on the wall and magnets on the refrigerator. These are distracting and can make buyers feel like they're spying rather than envisioning themselves owning the home. Removing picture frames is also an easy way to make a room appear more spacious.

Step 4: Take many photos

Have you ever been to a wedding where it seems like the photographer is in several places at once, snapping what appears to be an endless amount of photos? This is something you should emulate with your real estate photography, especially as a beginner. The more photos you take, the more you learn. Plus you'll have a better chance at having a few gems to show off if you take hundreds of pictures. Remember, you're shooting digital, you don't have to worry about wasting film. Just carry an extra SD card for your DSLR camera or upload your photos to a site like Flickr if you're on a smartphone. Taking hundreds of photos isn't an excuse to take poor or unplanned photos. Every time you hold your camera up you should be thinking about framing, lighting, and what you want to show off with that photo. Follow these steps to start taking great photos. And don't forget to share them with us!





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 11/8/2016

As a home seller, it is important to note that you're not alone in the real estate market. In fact, dozens of other nearby home sellers likely are doing everything they can to promote their residences to prospective homebuyers. This means that you may need to think outside the box to generate interest in your home. Fortunately, every homebuyer is looking for a bargain, and home sellers who offer incentives may be able to sweeten the deal if a homebuyer is interested in purchasing a residence. Incentives are readily available that you can offer to homebuyers, and some of the top incentives to consider include: 1. Covering the Closing Costs. Closing costs can add up quickly for homebuyers and may be a deterrent for a buyer to purchase a particular residence. However, you can eliminate this deterrent if you agree to cover even a portion of a homebuyer's closing costs. Agreeing to cover a homebuyer's closing costs up to a predetermined amount may help you seal the deal with a prospective buyer. And ultimately, this incentive could make it easier for you to reap the benefits of a quick sale. 2. Allocate a Set Amount for Home Upgrades. After a homebuyer conducts a property inspection, he or she may ask for upgrades to a residence's furnace, windows or other areas. These issues may be deal-breakers, unless you allocate a set amount to account for potential home upgrades. Completing these upgrades on your own may prove to be both time-consuming and costly. On the other hand, setting aside a set amount for upgrades and agreeing to deduct this amount from the total cost of your home could serve as a distinct incentive for homebuyers. Ultimately, you'll want to do as much as possible to ensure that a homebuyer remains interested in your home after an inspection is completed. And by determining a particular amount to deduct from your home's price and sticking to it following an inspection, you'll be better equipped to satisfy a homebuyer's home improvement demands. 3. Including the Appliances. You may have had your heart set on bringing your washer, dryer and refrigerator to your new home. Conversely, a homebuyer might want to avoid the hassle of installing new appliances if he or she buys your current residence. So what can you do? Including the appliances with your home may allow you to close the deal with a homebuyer. Remember, home appliances can be replaced, and you may be able to find new appliances that suit your future residence perfectly. And if a homebuyer wants the appliances in your home included in a deal, it may be worthwhile to offer this incentive to finalize an agreement. Selling a home can be tricky, and getting support from a real estate agent who understands the local market is essential. This real estate professional may help you brainstorm unique incentives that you can offer to homebuyers and speed up the home selling process. Consider the value of offering incentives to homebuyers, and you could boost your chances of a fast home sale.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 5/24/2016

One of the trickiest parts of buying or selling a home is the negotiation process. Too often when our home is involved our emotions get in the way and the deal can go south quickly. Negotiating is an art. A real estate professional is trained in negotiating but you will need to prepare too. Here are some hints to help you navigate the home sale negotiation process: Do your homework know your home’s worth, understand the value of your home in the marketplace. Be realistic about what your home is worth. Much of the work you did to the home was a labor of love and may not have a monetary value. Be patient, negotiations can take time. Do not let emotions (greed, pride, anger, or prejudice) get in the way of negotiating the best deal. Think of your home as “the house”,” instead of “my home.” You have made the decision to move so try to think of the sale as a business transaction. Take all reasonable offers seriously. Don't let a good deal walk away over a few hundred dollars. Try to look at the deal from the opposite side of the table. This will help you try to see where the potential buyer is coming from. Most of all, have a positive attitude. Don't get caught up in the game of negotiating instead remember the goal is to sell your house for a fair price and move on to your next adventure.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 3/29/2016

Beautiful Custom Kitchen Interior in a New House.An Open House can be an integral part of selling a home. Not every home is a candidate for an Open House due to factors like market conditions, location or condition. If you are planning an Open House there are some helpful hints to ensure you have the most successful Open House on the block. Here are some tips on how to have the perfect Open House:

  • In most communities, Sunday afternoon is typical and expected.
  • Two hours is also typical.
  • Avoid conflicts with holidays, community celebrations or special events such as the Super Bowl.
  • If possible try to be aware of the weather forecast, although this may be difficult to do.
There are some things you can do prior to your Open House to help it succeed. At least one week prior to your first Open House:
  • Host a brokers only Open House. Agents and brokers will preview your home and identify possible buyers they have for your home.
  • Make your home look as large as possible by moving large pieces of furniture into storage.
  • Remove items not included in the sale. Remove the chandelier you got for a wedding present and the bookcase that fits so perfectly it looks built-in. If buyers don't see it, they won't want it.
  • Take Fido with you. Make arrangements for your pets to leave the house when it is being shown.
  • Two to Three Days Before Your First Open House Clean the house top to bottom. Get in every nook and cranny, wipe down the walls, windowsills, vacuum the corners and baseboards and yes wash those windows.
    • Clean and buff your appliances, that includes the stove inside and out.
    • Launder all the bedding, towels, rugs and other fabrics in your home.
    • Touch up spots on the walls.
    • Sweep and clean out the garage.
    • Mow the lawn, sweep the sidewalks, and clean up the bushes and flowers.
    24 Hours Before Your First Open House
  • Air out the house by opening the windows.
  • Make your home smell delicious by baking bread or apple pie.
  • Go through each room one by one and try to look for last minute fixes.
  • Add an arrangement of flowers.