Lynn D'Avolio
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 5/23/2017

It has been said that owning a dog is like having a two year old that stays two for his entire life. There is some truth in this statement. Dogs--like children--have many needs, and each dog has a unique personality. But, as any dog owner will tell you, there is no greater joy than coming home to your tail-wagging, slobbering best friend. There are several factors you should consider before getting a dog. You'll want to think about how much time you have to spend with the dog, your family's ability to contribute to caring for him or her, and how suitable your home and yard are.

Your dog's new home

If you've always wanted a large, playful dog, you should think about the size of your home and yard. Big dogs and dogs with high energy need a lot of room to run around in. If you live on a busy road would you consider putting up a fence to keep your dog safe from traffic? If not you might have to tether your dog to a run in the backyard, which is significantly less fun and exercise for the both of you. Inside the home poses another challenge. If you are considering a puppy, know that there is much training involved to keep your dog safe and your house in one piece. One of the many benefits of adopting an older dog is that they tend to already be housebroken, avoiding a lot of clean-ups and chewed furniture.

Raising a dog is a team effort

If you are thinking about getting a puppy or a high energy dog (in other words, a "permanent puppy") it's important to recognize that your whole family will have to be on the same page when it comes to training. Your dog takes cues from your family's behavior. So if one person in your family allows the dog to jump up on them when another doesn't it will give the dog mixed signals. This is also true for rewarding good behavior. Your dog should obey each member of your family because they trust them, not fear them or feel dominant over them. Play-time and treats are a great way to build that trust with every member of your household.

Please consider adopting

We all have the image in our heads of our children playing with a new puppy. But the same joy and bonding can come from adopting an older dog. When you adopt, you can teach your kids the value of rescuing and caring for animals that have been neglected. What's more, adopting is also a way to show support for shelters rather than puppy mills who often breed puppies in poor conditions.

Guidelines for dogs and your home

  • If you have a small home and yard, get a small dog or an older, low-energy dog
  • Likewise, take the dog on lots of walk to make up for missed exercise in the yard
  • If you have a wooded yard be extra vigilant about ticks and fleas
  • Training never ends for you or your dog. Make sure you are constantly working with your dog





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 2/9/2016

There are several items that will make your life a bit easier if you have a toddler. These items are easily found at a pharmacy, hardware store, and safety supply store as well as online. This list will help you be prepared and breathe easy once you are settled in to your new home or apartment. Feel free to print and use this list to help you with your new home safety check. • Safety plugs or outlet covers or place furniture in front of outlets • Secure furniture that may topple to the wall • Install a toilet seat lock • Cordless window coverings • Install window guards and stops • Move furniture away from windows and screens • Nonslip pads in the tub • Soft cover for the bathtub spout and knobs • Secure oven door with lock latch • Stove guard blocks for knobs and burners • Any fireplace items must be placed out of reach • Childproof locks on cabinets • Nonslip pads under rugs • Remove toxic household plants




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 12/1/2015

Mold in a home can present serious health risks for the occupants, and even more problems for those looking to buy or sell a house. Remedying a major mold problem can be costly, so taking steps to ensure that mold can't gain a foothold is important for you and your family. Control the humidity - Keep your humidity levels low....No higher than 50%. Most people run into humidity issues in their basements, so think about getting a dehumidifier if you are having trouble with moisture levels. If you have central a/c, then controlling the humidity level of your house should be relatively easy, as the air in your home will be constantly on the move, keeping humidity from building up in any one particular room. Just be sure to have your air conditioning and heating ducts checked for signs of mold. Check Your Vents - Dryer, kitchen, and bathroom vents can all pose mold problems if they aren't built to blow exhaust directly out of your home. Flooding - If your home happens to incur flood damage, be sure to rectify the problem within 24 house, and at most, 48. Any longer than that, and you risk mold growth. Sometimes, minor flooding issues can be overlooked for a day or two, so if there are any instances where carpets, rugs, or upholstery are moist or wet for an extended period of time, then have them replaced to avoid mold complications. Painting - If you plan to paint your home, look into adding mold inhibitors to your paint. This will cut down on the amount of places in your home that mold can proliferate. If you suspect that your home has an existing mold problem, then please follow the link provided. http://www.epa.gov/mold/moldcleanup.html





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 9/29/2015

If you were to guess which area in your home poses the most safety hazards, what would be your answer?  The kitchen?  The basement? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, every year about 235,000 people over age 15 visit emergency rooms because of injuries suffered in the bathroom, and almost 14 percent are hospitalized. More than a third of the injuries happen while bathing or showering. More than 14 percent occur while using the toilet. By taking some simple steps in your own bathroom, you can cut the risk of serious injury to yourself and your loves ones dramatically.

  • Install support railings right outside of your tub.
  • Put down an anti-slippage mat on the floor of your tub.
  • Take extra care when using electrical outlets in your bathroom. Install a hand towel holder next to outlets, and get in the habit of making sure your hands are dried before plugging and unplugging electrical devices.
  • Be sure that bathroom rugs around your toilet and sink have excellent anti-slip capabilities, and replace your rugs when they become worn.
After following these steps, re-evaluate your bathroom. Can you find anything else that may pose a danger?





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 10/14/2014

2012 has brought a rash of new West Nile Virus cases in the New England area. Many areas are now taking measures to combat further spread of the virus, from public awareness campaigns to large-scale pesticide spraying in the worst-hit areas. There are many steps you can take to minimize your exposure to the mosquitoes that carry West Nile Virus. A simple survey of your home and lawn can pinpoint trouble areas where insects would naturally congregate. Do you have any freestanding patches of water on your property? If so, fill them in with dirt. Stagnant water is typically a breeding ground for mosquitoes. If you live near a pond or lake, your city may already be treating the area to ensure mosquito levels are kept in check, but there's no harm in calling your local city health department. If you happen to own a pond, then consider stocking it with fish or some other form of life that could feed on any insect populations that find it inviting. What about guarding your home? Tight mesh window screens are your first line of defense, followed up with a citronella candle burning in the window sill if you happen to want to keep your windows open. Consider switching your outdoor light bulbs a little dimmer than usual, so as to not attract large groups of insects. Additionally, you may want to think about opting for yellow bulbs if you are in a particularly mosquito-prone area. Mindfulness is your friend here. Tell your family and friends to take care to not leave doors and windows open for too log between dusk and dawn.  Remember....Even though it's getting colder out, the West Nile risk will not significantly decrease until your area experiences its first hard frost. For more information on West Nile Virus, including up-to-the-date reports of confirmed cases, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/index.htm




Categories: Help Around the House