Lynn D'Avolio
J. Barrett & Company | 801-597-2857 | lynn1@soldbylynn.com


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 8/27/2019

If this is your first home sale, you might be wondering about what your requirements are in terms of home inspections. A vital step in the closing process, professional home inspections are typically included in real estate contracts as a contingency (the sale is dependent upon their completion).

But, are there any situations in which a seller would get a home inspection?

In today’s post, we’re going to talk about why sellers might want to get their home inspection and how it could be useful to the home sale process overall.

To diagnose problems with your home

When you’re deciding on the asking price of your home, you’ll want to take into account all of the things that could potentially drive that price down. Inspectors will look for a number of issues in your home, which can save you from any surprises when a potential buyer orders their inspection of your home.

The further along in the home sale process when you discover an expensive repair that needs to be made, the more complicated it makes your home sale.

So, if you’re in any doubt about whether your home will need repairs now or in the near future, ordering an inspection could be a safe option.

What do inspectors look for?

When inspecting your home, a licensed professional will look at several things:

  • Exterior components of your home, such as cracks or broken seals on exterior surfaces, garage door function and safety, and so on.

  • The structural integrity of your home; checking your foundation for dangerous cracks where moisture can enter and cause damage in the form of mold or breaks in the foundation.

  • The roof of your home will be checked for things like broken or loose shingles or nearby tree branches that could damage your home or nearby power lines in a storm.

  • The HVAC system will be tested to make sure it’s running properly and efficiently and also that vents are clean and clear of debris.

  • Interior components of your home will be checked for safety and damage from things like pests and water damage.

Will the seller still order an inspection if my home just had one?

An inspection contingency is built into almost all real estate contracts to protect the interests of the buyer and seller alike.

In most circumstances, a buyer will want to get their own inspection performed. After all, they don’t know who you went to for an inspection and whether they were licensed in your state.

The bottom line

Ultimately, if you’re planning on selling your home in the near future and aren’t sure if your home may have any underlying issues, it’s usually a good idea to get an inspection to make sure you can plan for any repairs or inform potential buyers of any issues with your home.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 2/5/2019

There are few things for a home seller that are more stressful than the home inspection. You hope and pray that everything will come out a-OK in your house so that your buyers will want to continue with the sale without asking for too many contingencies. There’s a few simple things that you can do to make sure your home inspection goes smoothly. The good news is that these tasks won’t cost you a lot of time or money. A few simple actions can save you a lot of grief in unnecessary service calls. Check out these tips to help you get through the home inspection with flying colors:


Check Your Light Bulbs


If you have a light bulb that’s simply burnt out, that could prompt the need for a check of the entire electrical system in your home. Avoid a costly visit from an electrician just by checking your light bulbs and replacing them where necessary. 


Check Your Air Filters 


The air filters in your home can be easily neglected and be a big problem in the home inspection process. Even if a filter looks a little gray, take the time to replace it. You should check your air filters and furnace filters for any potential problems like tears or excess dirt. For bonus points, you may want to just replace the filters before the inspection no matter how little dirt they have on them. Otherwise, a clogged filter can be a sign that your furnace or heating and cooling system isn’t working properly. 


Check Your Sinks


A few dollars spent on some drain unclogging chemicals is a few hundred dollars potentially saved on a plumber. Fill up your sinks with water and see how they drain. If they’re a bit slow, get the chemicals that you need to work on unclogging the drains (such as Drain-o). If there’s a funny smell coming from the drain, be sure to address it. Lemons also work wonders on everything from drains to garbage disposals. Even some baking soda and vinegar can help to clean a drain wonderfully. 


Fix Major Repairs Before Your Home Goes On The Market


If you know something pressing needs to be fixed or replaced in your home, be sure to fix it before the home even goes on the market. It’s much easier to take care of things before a buyer’s contingency and a time limit is involved. Although you may be hesitant to spend the money, you should replace certain appliances, fix the roof, or address that creaky floor before the “For Sale” sign even goes out front.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 7/24/2018

For home sellers, accepting a homebuyer's offer represents one of many steps you'll need to complete to finalize your home sale. In fact, accepting a homebuyer's proposal provides no guarantees, and a homebuyer likely will conduct a home inspection that may determine whether he or she moves forward with a home purchase.

Ultimately, a home inspection may make or break your home sale. But if you spend some time preparing for a home inspection, you can improve your chances of accelerating the home selling process.

Here are three tips to help home sellers get ready for a home inspection.

1. Clean Up Your Home's Interior and Exterior

A home inspector will investigate every nook and cranny of your house. As such, you'll want to ensure your residence dazzles when a home inspector visits, as any flaw could damage your chances of finalizing your home sale.

Conduct an extensive clean-up of your house's interior and exterior – you'll be happy you did. With a neat, tidy home, you'll be able to improve your chances of making a positive impression on a home inspector.

Plus, evaluating your residence before a home inspection ensures you can identify and address any minor flaws before the evaluation. That way, you'll be able to eliminate any problems and improve your chances of a fast, seamless home inspection that won't jeopardize your home sale.

2. Ensure All Areas of Your Home Are Easily Accessible

A home inspector will want to examine your hot water heater, your home's siding and more, so you'll want to make every area of your home easily accessible to a home inspector to guarantee he or she can perform the assessment properly.

Although a home inspector may uncover a variety of problems with your residence, the assessment represents a valuable learning opportunity for both you and the homebuyer. Thus, if all areas of your home are easily accessible, you may be able to make the most of this opportunity, learn about hidden problems with your residence and work to resolve these issues accordingly.

3. Consult with Your Real Estate Agent

Let's face it – a home inspection can be stressful, particularly for home sellers who want to finalize a home sale as soon as possible. Luckily, your real estate agent can help you minimize stress and ensure you know exactly what to expect before, during and after a home inspection.

Your real estate agent can answer any of your home inspection questions and ensure you are fully prepared for the assessment. In addition, your real estate agent will collaborate with you and the homebuyer. And if problems are discovered during a home inspection, your real estate agent will help you determine the best course of action.

When it comes to a home inspection, there is no need to worry. If you use the aforementioned tips to prepare for a home inspection, you'll be able to improve your chances of speeding up the home selling process.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 5/8/2018

It’s easy to fall in love with a house if it has all the features you’re looking for. However, it’s important not to ignore the qualities of the neighborhood the house is in as well.

The state of the surrounding neighborhood is important for many homeowners. You’ll use the local amenities, walk on the sidewalks, drive on the roads, and eventually even set the price of your home based partially on the price of those surrounding it.

In this article, we’re going to discuss some of the reasons you should pay attention to the neighborhood when shopping for homes, and what qualities to look for to find a place that has both high quality of life and resale value.  

Neighborhood Inspection 101

There are a number of things you’ll want to learn about a neighborhood before you move in. Some of them you can observe with your own eye, some you can find online via public records, and others will require talking to the locals to see what their experience has been.

Things to observe

When you go to visit a home, set aside some time beforehand to drive around the neighborhood. Check out the roads, sidewalks, and the general state of the neighborhood. Boarded up houses and closed businesses aren’t always a sign of doom and gloom, but it can give you insight into the pricing of some homes and give you some negotiating power.

If you love the house and feel okay about the neighborhood swing by during rush hour, if possible. This will give you a sense of traffic and how long it will take you to get to work from your new home.

If you’re moving into a city, it’s also a good idea to check out the after-hours scene. If a peaceful evening at home is what you seek, it will be a good idea to know ahead of time if your street comes alive at night.

Things to research

It’s a good idea to get a feel for the local culture before buying a home to see if it fits with your lifestyle. Are businesses closed on Sundays? Are there community events and clubs that you ur your family would be interested in? You can find most information online through Facebook groups, library websites, and local newspapers.

If you’re concerned with crime, you can find local data online. Similarly, records are available for local schools, such as where the town’s test scores land compared to state and national averages.

Talk to the neighbors

The most practical way to learn about a neighborhood is to ask the people who live there. They’ll be able to tell you how it has changed over the years, which will give you a sense of where the neighborhood is headed. They can tell you whether it’s a neighborhood filled with young families or aging retirees, and will likely be able to let you know if there are any problems in the neighborhood.

Aside from the local culture, you should ask your potential new neighbors about the infrastructure. Do they have frequent power issues? Is there often noisy construction, or have there been potholes that haven’t been filled for years? You can learn a lot from the people who have lived in a neighborhood for multiple years.





Posted by Lynn D'Avolio on 4/3/2018

Once you start the process of buying a home, you may begin to feel as if you know everything there is to know about real estate. There’s so much house hunting, researching and negotiating that the process can be dizzying. Once you get into a contract and start the home inspection process, a whole new host of questions comes to the table. Now, you need to know the nitty gritty of what you’re about to buy. 


Once you hire a home inspector, it could seem like they are speaking an entirely different language. These inspectors will be looking for any and all potential problems with your new dream home. In order to get the most out of your home inspection, you’ll want to ask smart questions.


How Much Of An Impact Does This Have?


Home inspectors cannot legally tell you whether a property is “good” or not. They can only tell you the things they find wrong with the property, or where they see a need for improvement. These inspectors will seem pretty even keeled when you meet them, so they can be hard to read. They’re all about facts. Asking them what kind of an impact a certain problem will have can help you to make a more informed decision. 



Who Can Fix This?


In many states, home inspectors cannot legally make repair recommendations. They can however give you an idea of how easy or how complicated it may be to fix something. You may find that you’ll be able to make simple repairs on your own rather than hire someone for a big price. The only drawback is that home inspectors cannot actually “fix” anything for you. They can only give advice.  


What’s A Priority?


Your home inspector can give you an idea of what issues in the home you are about to buy need to be fixed first. Since the inspector's job is to point out absolutely everything- both big and small- you’ll want to know what has the biggest priority so that you can plan accordingly. If things are at the “end of their lifetime” rather than in need of a simple repair, you’ll understand as a homebuyer how much money you’ll need to shell out for repairs sooner rather than later.   


Where Is That?


Many times as home inspectors as heading through the property, mentioning things that need repairs and attention, you may have no idea what they are referring to. It’s a good idea to have a notepad and and a camera so that you can refer back to what the inspector was talking about. Some inspectors even insert digital pictures into their reports, so you can ask about that when you’re hiring an inspector.   

How Does That Work?


Inspectors can often give you an idea of how different moving parts of the home operate. If you’re new to homeownership, or come across something that you have never seen before, your inspector will be happy to help you figure it all out. It can be a lifesaver once you move in since you’ll already know how much of the house operates.